pink squirrel

Top Flies for Driftless Area Trout: Guides, Fly Shop Owners, and Trout Bums Pick Their Favorite Patterns for Driftless Spring Creeks

 

Under-the-radar flies that will help you catch more fish in the spring creeks of the Driftless Area…

The Driftless is an amazing and unique fishery, and it arguably holds some of the most fascinating spring creeks in the world. Though standard trout flies catch their share of fish, a few unique patterns have sprung up from the special set of circumstances a spring creek brings a trout fisherman. A few guides, fly shop owners, and avid trout bums have graciously agreed to share some of their favorite trout patterns for the spring creeks of the Driftless Area. Some are standard trout patterns that have been tweaked for local waters, but most have been tied, tested, and developed specifically for the trout of the Driftless Area.Top flies for the Driftless bros small

Dave Anderson, On the Fly Guide Service

Dave Anderson is a veteran guide on the streams and creeks of southeastern Minnesota’s Driftless Area. After guiding on local Driftless streams for over a decade, he has great knowledge of the bug life and the most productive flies on the area’s unique streams….

Really, most guys do not need a ton of flies in the Driftless to be successful outside of hatch specific patterns. Right now (August), I’m still fishing scuds, but it is a #14 with a very specific dubbing: ice dub and corgi fur.

Another scud...Fly and pic from Dave Anderson, On the Fly Guiding, ontheflyguiding.com,

Another scud…Fly and pic from Dave Anderson, On the Fly Guide Service, ontheflyguiding.com

  • Hook: TMC2487 or TMC2457 #14-16
  • Thread: Orange 6/0 (8/0 on #16 and smaller)
  • Tail:  (optional) pearlescent or orange krystal flash strands, silver flashabou
  • Dubbing: Orange or sulphur orange, gray, olive, pink/ Ice Dub UV Pink Shrimp
  • Shell Back: Small piece of plastic to cover the dubbing  or twisted krystal flash strands
  • Ribbing: Fine copper wire
  • Weight: Turns of .15 or .20 weight
Black Wet Fly - Fly and pic by Dave Anderson, On the Fly Guide Service

Black Wet Fly – Fly and pic by Dave Anderson, On the Fly Guide Service, ontheflyguiding.com

The Black Wet Fly is a pattern that lots of local guys fish this time of year (August). It’s a local pattern and probably isn’t well-known outside of the area.

  • (Recipe by 3 Brothers Flies) Hook: #10-16 nymph
  • Thread: Black 8/0 UNI
  • Weight: A few wraps of lead free wire
  • Shellback: A few strands of Krystal Flash
  • Body: Black dubbing, dubbed to form a somewhat fat body
  • Hackle: Black dry fly hackle
PT’s are pretty standard fare, although with all of the flooding we have endured down here this past year, many of our rocks are stripped clean of the usual bugs one runs into. Tricos are going in places here, so really small black PT type nymphs would work if you weren’t fishing a dry. Most of the stuff I tie and fish isn’t real complicated, but it also has some very specific ingredients.
Dave also offers hand-tied flies specifically for the trout of southeastern Minnesota and the rest of the Driftless Area. Be sure to check out his site for stream reports and guide trips for the Minnesota Driftless.  

Driftless On the Fly

The guys over at Driftless On the Fly run a sweet operation guiding the waters of northeastern Iowa. Iowa is an often under-appreciated and overlooked fly fishing locale, but Jared Koenigsfeld and Ryan Rahmiller do an awesome job highlighting the great fly fishing opportunities found in Iowa on their website and blog. Here are a few of their best flies for the Driftless….

Fly and pic: Driftless on the Fly

Fly and pic by Driftless on the Fly

3$ Dip w/ UV Wing– The UV wing is what makes this guy special, almost any time of the day you can turn a fish with a midge and the added UV wing just gives it a little more flash like an air bubble on an emerging larva or wing. Top colors are Red, Rust, Black, and Olive and is sizes #16-22.

Fly and pic by Driftless on the Fly

Price of Darkness – Fly and pic by Driftless on the Fly

Prince of Darkness– We do have some stones in the Driftless of Iowa believe it or not, most of them are pretty small in the spring creeks. This fly just gives a new look to the standard Prince, black helps in dirty water situations. We use these especially in the Winter and Spring months, in sizes #14 & 16

 
Missing Link Caddis - Fly and pic by Driftless on the Fly

Missing Link Caddis – Fly and pic by Driftless on the Fly

Missing Link Caddis – Great searching fly through the Spring to Fall months. Perfect for that solo riser along your favorite stream that you just can’t see what he’s eating, this fly has it ALL! From its spent look to its upright wing there’s just something buggy about this fly that really gets the fish up to the surface. Our favorite colors are Olive and Brown in sizes #14-18

 
Indicator Beetle - Fly and pic by Driftless on the Fly

Indicator Beetle – Fly and pic by Driftless on the Fly

Indicator Beetle – Another great prospecting fly for the Summer and Fall months. Toss it along some high grassy banks in the peak heat of summer and you might be surprised to see the stream swallow your fly on impact. Works well as a dropper behind a hopper, solo, or even my favorite as a top fly with a real small nymph dropper, we prefer sizes #14 &16.

Hot Head Wooly Bugger - Fly and pic by Driftless on the Fly

Hot Head Wooly Bugger – Fly and pic by Driftless on the Fly

Hot-Bead Wooly Bugger – Its your standard Wooly Bugger but with a little twist, I never leave home with out these guys in my arsenal. In early Fall through late Spring, they can move some of your largest fish you have seen in your local water. Always vary your technique to key in on the action they are looking for, from low and slow to shallow and fast. Keep that a Florescent Orange bead and the body in black and brown, sizes #10-4.

 
Guide flies - Fly and pic by Driftless on the Fly

Guide flies – Fly and pic by Driftless on the Fly

Guide Flies – Of course we use many standardized flies from day to day, which of most are what we call “Guide Flies”. The point being we want flies that are- simple yet effective, and that your able to tie 2 dozen in an hour or two without any difficulty before the next days trip. Keeping the same design, but a change in color or size allows us to do just that. Pictured here are Barr’s Vis-A-Dun in a Baetis, and a Shop-Vac. 

Ben Carlson, Jolly Fly Fishing

An avid fly angler and trout bum, Ben Carlson has been fly fishing the streams of the Driftless Area since he was a young teen. He is the head guide at Jolly Fly Fishing, offering guided trips on his beloved home waters, the famous Rush and Kinnickinnic Rivers. His experience on these two popular western Wisconsin streams gives him a unique perspective on spring creek fly patterns, of which he shares a few thoughts and patterns here…

I am a big dry fly guy and being a spring creek fishermen I love and live for my mayfly hatches… so here are three of my favorites. They are all spin offs of generic patterns modified for my specific streams (primarily the Kinni and the Rush). A few notes about my flies in general… I never tie a traditional catskill style full hackle dry fly, it is always either a parachute or comparadun. In spring creeks there is not a lot of whitewater, which means that it it relatively flat and the trout can see pretty well (which makes our job hard). So tying a parachute or comparadun leaves the fly flush to the water and resembles a mayfly in its most vulnerable stage, fully emerged but unable to move yet as it’s wings still have to dry. One of my fly fishing mentors is a man by the name of David Halvorson, he is a retired Doctor and loves his BWOs, and his BWO pattern was featured in a fly tying magazine a few years ago… So the first pattern I’ll share is what I call Doc’s Parachute BWO.

Doc’s Parachute BWO

  • Hook- 18-22 dry fly hook 
  • Thread – Olive 
  • Tail- Dun Colored Hackle Fibers
  • Abdomen- Thread wraps (thicker near thorax)
  • Wing Post- Mix of Dun and White Enrico Pulgisi Fibers
  • Hackle- size 20 or 22 Dun or Grizzly Hackle

On flies this small, I do not dub them as it throws off the silhouette, instead I use thread wraps that get thicker near the thorax for the body. As with any dry, presentation and the right shape will outperform perfect colors. I love the BWO hatches because they can be quite prolific, especially if you hit the weather right. A cool, cloudy, and drizzly day makes these bugs come off with fury and the trout to rise to them, and this is usually the only pattern I throw to match this hatch. Another reason that the parachute works well is the trout are usually centered on the back eddies and slower moving parts of the pool, allowing this fly to sit perfectly on the water.

Granny Smith PMD - Fly and pic by Ben Carlson, Jolly Fly Fishing

Granny Smith PMD – Fly and pic by Ben Carlson, Jolly Fly Fishing

Granny Smith Comparadun PMD – My second fly is the Granny Smith Comparadun PMD

  • Hook 16-20 Dry Fly Hook
  • Thread – Chartreuse
  • Tail- Anrton or Poly Yarn
  • Body- Thread Wraps Thicker near Thorax 
  • Wing- Summer Deer Hair

I have heard them called PMDs, PEDs, Light Hendricksons, and Sulphurs, but they all fall under basically the same scientific classification. This hatch, which happens in the early evening in the earlier parts of the hatch but moves later and later with the season, can be absolutely crazy, as the color of the bugs can change. On the Kinni, the insects literally change color during the hatch starting out a light yellow and moving towards a light green (hence the name Granny Smith). The fish will be sensitive to this change and also to how it sits on the water. These comparduns are what the big fish in slow or flat water will take, so basically anything outside the main riffle. Be careful not to tie with too dark of a green and keep the wings a light color, anything too dark and it resembles a BWO and the fish won’t take it.

My last fly is a Trico pattern, and it’s really simple:

  • Hook- Size 20-24 dry fly hook
  • Thread- Black
  • Body- Thread Wraps
  • Wing Post- Poly Yarn
  • Wing- Poly Yarn
  • Tail- 2 or 3 Poly Yarn Fibers

This fly matches both the duns and spinners that you will find during a Trico hatch. Tie the wing post as you normally would but instead of tying hackle around it tie on another piece of poly yarn spinner wing style around the post. The tail is very minute, I have even left if off before and still caught fish. Starting in mid July, anytime the air temp hits 60 degrees these bugs come off and although tiny provide some great dry fly fishing if you are willing to wake up early enough!

Brian Smolinski (b smo), Lund’s Fly Shop

Brian J Smolinski (better known as b smo) is the owner of Lund’s Fly Shop, a full-service fly shop near the Rush and Kinnickinnic Rivers in River Falls, Wisconsin. He also ties some sweet streamers and tubes with materials from his fly tying company, Misfit fly co. As the owner of a local Driftless fly shop, Brian has a great pulse on the top-producing local fly patterns….

b smo's Pink Princess - Fly and pic by Brian Smolinski, Lund's Fly Shop

b smo’s Pink Princess – Fly and pic by Brian Smolinski, Lund’s Fly Shop

b smo’s Pink Princess – This fly was a custom order I got at the shop. This unnamed customer/friend asked me to come up with a fly that would be a combination of two very popular patterns that have been the most productive for them. The prince nymph and the hot pink squirrel. I decided that a dubbed body would be easier to create the desired profile, similar to the Lund’s Pink Squirrels. I love the peacock color of ice dub, but prefer to mix some rabbit hair in with all my ice dub to get a dubbing texture I like. 

One can hardly mention fly fishing in the Driftless without the infamous Pink Squirrel popping up. The Squirrel has attained a legendary, almost mythical status in the Driftless Area, spawning fish stories of ridiculous proportions and more than a few variations on the pattern. As Brian mentioned, Lund’s Pink Squirrel utilizes a curved scud hook, a short tail of Krystal Flash, and a two-toned dubbed body, notably using dubbing instead of chenille for the fly’s iconic pink hot spot. He also mentioned that Lund’s rendition appears to outsell the original three to one…

Lund's Pink Squirrel - Fly and pic by Brian Slominski, Lund's Fly Shop

Lund’s Pink Squirrel – Fly and pic by Brian Slominski, Lund’s Fly Shop

Lund’s Pink Squirrel – (Recipe by Brian J Smolinski)

Lund's HOT Pink Squirrel - Fly and pic by Brian J Smolinski - Lund's Fly Shop

Lund’s HOT Pink Squirrel – Fly and pic by Brian J Smolinski – Lund’s Fly Shop

Lund’s HOT Pink Squirrel (Recipe by Brian J Smolinski)

Lund’s Pink Squirrel – I have lost track of how many times anglers have come into the shop and told me that they were getting skunked out on their favorite stretch of trout water, until they pulled out one of these beauties. They consistently seem to produce trout of all sizes on the Rush, Kinni, Trimbelle, and many other streams right around this area. With hundreds of new patterns coming out every year, this is a pattern that always seems to be a staple in our customer’s fly boxes. For the Lund’s HOT Pink Squirrel, use black dubbing for the abdomen, UV Fluorescent hot pink Ice Dub for the thorax, and gold wire for the rib. This varies from the original pattern tied by John Bethke. We’ve had these two versions custom-tied for us for a few years now and sold thousands of them. They continue to be one of the most productive nymphs for many anglers.  

Nate and Jim Martin, Spirit Streams Fly Fishing

Focusing on the Driftless trout of Wisconsin, the Spirit Streams crew offers guided trips and some amazing posts on the Driftless over on their site and blog. Here are two of their most productive trout patterns…

Coulee Crusader Caddis - fly and pic by Spirit Streams Fly Fishing

Coulee Crusader Caddis – fly and pic by Spirit Streams Fly Fishing

Coulee Crusader Caddis – The Coulee Crusader is a prolific trout-producing pattern throughout the year, but excels in May and June and in the evenings the remainder of the year.  Adult Stonefly and Midge variants can be made with this pattern.  Very productive.

  • Hook: Mustad 94840 or equivalent, #16 and #18
  • Wing:  Coastal Deer, Natural
  • Hackle:  Barred Grizzly
  • Dubbing:  Brown, Green, Gray, Black


Notes:  Tie in hackle parachute style, 3 turns.  Dubbing pile at wing and direct hackles back toward hook bend.

Red Storm - fly and pic by Spirit Streams Fly Fishing

Red Storm – fly and pic by Spirit Streams Fly Fishing

Red Storm – The Red Storm is a year-round lethal trout enticer. The pattern is based on the traditional Woolly Bugger but with a few key additions including the red collar. The red collar is the hot spot which attracts trout to the point of irresistibility. It is one of our crème de la crème fly patterns.

  • Hook: Mustad 9672 or equivalent, #10 or #12
  • Bead: Tungsten cone, gold, small
  • Tail: Black Strung Marabou Feather
  • Body: Chenille, small, black (it should have a sparkle to it)
  • Hackle:  Black Saddle Hackle Feather
  • Collar: Red Crystal & Tri Lobal Fibers

 ———————————-

Standard nymphing and dry fly strategies are adequate for most creeks in the Driftless. Trailing a smaller, more imitative nymph (such as a Shop Vac or $3 Dip) behind a more gaudy attractor fly (Pink Squirrels, Black Wet Flies, scuds) is an especially deadly tactic. Dry-dropper rigs are another great strategy, particularly in the summer months when the terrestrials are out in force. We’ve also found that Driftless fish are particularly susceptible to some slight movement or jigging action worked into the drift.

This is a great selection of bugs that will serve an angler well throughout the entire season. All these patterns are well suited to the conditions that the small, fertile trout streams of the Driftless bring to the angler and will take plenty of trout on the local spring creeks.

Tie up a few of these bugs and toss them on the local trout streams this season. You won’t be disappointed!

Secret Waters: Fly Fishing the Driftless Backcountry

As we started the hot, demanding hike down the steep canyon walls, I wondered if it would be worth it. I’d been here only once before, and caught brown trout, but that was in the cool weather of September when the trout were quite active, not the smothering heat of a July afternoon. Other rivers around here shut down in the midsummer heat, and I was worried I might find a similar situation down in the valley. But the thought of having a beautiful stretch of water all to ourselves was enough to make up my mind.

Most people don’t think of the Driftless Area having a “backcountry”. It’s certainly not the vast tracts of unbroken wilderness you’d find out West, but there are definitely remote, unpressured waters deep in the Driftless wilderness that seldom see a fly or a fisherman. A few have trails, but most require an often difficult bushwack down steep bluffs and through fields of stinging nettles. The best trout streams (the ones that are full of fish but void of fisherman) seem to guard themselves with their natural surrounding. Driftless creeks are protected by sizzling nettles and limestone cliffs and arduous hikes. Which is fine by me. Keeps out the gunnysackers and the casual fisherman, leaving it only to the dedicated angler that respects the waters.

Rugged country

Rugged country

The goal of our mission today was to further explore a stretch of backcountry creek and hopefully find a bunch of eager wild brown trout. Busting through the thick brush, we started our descent into the canyon and soon found ourselves on a small feeder creek studded with beaver ponds. Some spots looked very trouty for a small stream, especially for a creek way back in the sticks, but a quick stream temp read 68 degrees, a bit warm for shaded water in the morning. Further downstream the creek looked more promising as a few small springs poured into the stream, but I was hungry for the main river, so I decided to keep the rod in the pack. We pressed on through the valley, and after an hour emerged around the ridge to find the main river. It was gorgeous, one of the prettiest pieces of water I’ve ever laid my eyes on. The stream, about twenty feet wide, flowed turquoise blue with just enough stain to create the perfect conditions for fishing. It rushed through riffles and over boulders, carving its way through the rugged valley, occasionally forming the deep, dark cliff pools found mostly in a trout fisherman’s dreams. A few trout were gently rising in the big cliff pool. The best part was we had it all to ourselves. There wasn’t even a sign of other fisherman in the pristine valley. It was a trout fisherman’s heaven!

Cliff pool on a feeder creek

Cliff pool on a feeder creek

Braden and Noah chased the risers while I headed downstream. I rounded the bend to find a long, slow pool and a few trout dimpling the surface. I chopped off my nymph and grabbed a #20 black cdc comparadun from my pack. The fish were rising sporadically, but just steadily enough to float a dry over them. After repeatedly drifting the fly over the trout with what I thought was a good presentation, I didn’t get a response from the fish, so I tied on another nymph rig. The water was perfect for nymphing. The creek was just high and stained enough to give the trout some security and lose their typically stingy wariness, but clear enough to prevent the need for huge, flashy nymphs. The water was more reminiscent of a freestone stream than the average spring creek. Fast, riffled water plunged over boulders into little pools and runs for as far as you could see. The canyon had a wildness to it, not like the overwhelming awesomeness of the Rocky Mountain high country, but more of a gentle, intimate wilderness begging to be explored.

Honestly, the first hour of my fishing was pretty frustrating. I busted off a good half-dozen nymphs in the brush (must’ve been my casting the wind), and lost more trout than I care to remember. Fly fishing can be quite humbling. But then things started to pick up. I settled on a #14 hare and copper with a #16 frenchie ptn eighteen inches below, all under an indicator. I found a nice little pool with a riffle and a few midstream boulders and pockets, and tossed my nymphs into the whitewater. A few mends, a short drift, and my indicator dipped slightly. I set the hook and brought my first trout of the season to hand, a pretty little wild brown.

The fishing was quite good for the next couple of hours. I kept working my way downstream through the seemingly endless series of awesome riffles and pools and runs, hooking a trout in almost every fishy spot. I found the most productive technique by accident. The nymphs were starting to drag at the tail of the pool, and as I was preparing to recast a trout came flying out of nowhere and slammed my fly, but I missed him. Wondering if it was just a fluke, I dropped my nymphs near the head of the pool and just as they reached the middle, I allowed them to drag and swing in the current. Sure enough, another brown charged out from the depths and took my fly.

A small spring pouring ice-cold water into the creek

A small spring pouring ice-cold water from the hillside

I picked up plenty of browns (sixteen total), including a nice fifteen incher that took me a few pools downstream on my 6x tippet, but most averaged eight inches. A good chunk of the trout were taken with a twitch or slight swing of the flies over the deep holes and runs. I hiked back upstream to find the rest of the guys. Braden and Noah had camped out on the cliff pool and took a handful of wild browns mostly on dry flies. The little browns slashed aggressively at their #12 black ant, with only one coming on a pink squirrel nymph.fifteen inch Driftless Area backcountry trout fly fishing se MN

“Blue lining” and exploring new water is one of my absolute favorite parts of fly fishing. There’s just something about the adventure of finding a creek on a map, dreaming about it all winter, and then finally hiking in to find it full of trout that gets my adrenaline going. The Driftless Area is an awesome place that has a bunch of different experiences for the fly fisher, but the “backcountry” can be truly amazing if you’re willing to do some serious bushwacking (usually into a state forest or wildlife management area). So grab a map and your hiking boots, find a blue line, and you might just find your fly fishing heaven!

Next we’re headed up to the lake for some summer bassin, which should be pretty good with the late spring we had.

Tight Lines,

Conner

Fly Fishing the Driftless Area

This weekend Dad and I camped in SE Minnesota. I recently finished an online hunter safety course, so we were down there for the field day. I just happened to plan it close to a bunch of trout streams, so we obviously fished. We arrived Friday night and set up camp. The next morning it was off to the field day. After that Dad and I got a bite to eat at a small pizza place in town, and then we went to one of our favorite streams.Dad fished a pink squirrel, while I threw on a #16 ant. Three casts later I landed this beautiful brown.I kept fishing, but found that my ant wouldn’t float. I should have put another ant on, but, not thinking, I put on a deer hair hopper. Dad was fishing down stream in a hole that has produced for me before.

Hooked!

Dad's fifth of the day!

 Dad stayed in one spot and pulled out five nice brookies, while I walked around and didn’t catch any more. I also met a very nice fly fisher who gave me some flies. (Thanks Mr. Schulz) Definitely not a bad trip.

The next morning Dad and I hung out at camp for a while, but then got caught in the rain. So we quickly got packed up and hit the road. On the way home, we fished a new stream, and it was a good choice.

Very beautiful Driftless Area stream.

I tied on a bead-headed olive woolly bugger that I got from Mr. Schulz. The brown trout were nibbling it, but no solid bites yet. Then I saw a flash and moments later I brought this vibrant brown to hand.

Notice the bright red tail

Clear water

Dad opted not to fish, since the stream wasn’t very big. I fished my way upstream and lost quite a few flies on fish. Then I switched to a Chernobyl Ant, and got quite a few takes but missed the hook set. Finally I hooked one, but just as I was about to net it he threw the hook. I kept fishing and had a few more bites, but nothing stuck. It was a great weekend of camping and fly fishing.

Next we’re headed up to the lake for some warmwater fly fishing. Smallmouth on the fly should be lots of fun!

Tight Lines,

Braden

 

Exploring

Today Grandpa, Noah and I fished a few local trout streams that we hadn’t fished before. First stop was a small creek that has a native population of brook trout. There aren’t too many holes or fish here, and you have to walk a lot, but I managed to catch one small brookie on a Pink Squirrel and LDR another. The thermometer measured 58 degrees on this overgrown, narrow creek. We fished a good chunk of stream and oddly, didn’t even see any more trout. After that, we checked out a stream that supposedly has some rainbows. We fished some sweet looking holes for about an hour without seeing any trout. The stream temp read around seventy degrees, which is at the high end of what trout can tolerate. The river was wide and slow for the most part, with a few riffles and deep holes mixed in. All we caught were chubs in this marginal trout stream. Tough day, but still fun to get on the water.

Brook trout stream

Where are the fish?

Stream #2 - big water

Sweet hole

Trout-less riffle

Braden is fishing the Driftless Area right now, so look for a (hopefully) trout-filled report in the next couple of days.

Tight Lines,

Conner

 

Spring Creek Brookies

Today we drove down to a Winona County stream for a day of fishing. We started the morning by fishing way up in the headwaters on an artificials only, catch and release section. The stream here is a classic meadow spring creek, very cold and weedy. Not a lot of holes up there, but when you find a good one it is stacked with trout. Despite being small, this creek holds some ridiculously large browns.

We got there around 10:30. Braden started the day by nailing four nice brookies and a brown, all on a #14 Czeched Out Hare’s Ear. It is basically a tungsten hare’s ear with a pink hot spot and some soft hackle (Hans Stephenson from Dakota Angler and Outfitter has a great video on this fly here). I hiked upstream and caught a gorgeous 8″ brookie and a brown out of a sweet hole on my brown micro tubing mayfly nymph (MTMN).

A dry dropper was the way to go this morning. I fished a #8 stimulator with a #14 micro tubing mayfly nymph dropper. Braden had a hopper dropper combo with a little pheasant tail and a Czeched Out Hare’s Ear on the bottom to get everything down. Braden got hits when he twitched his flies, otherwise they would get ignored. A few trout slashed at our dries, but nothing commited.

We stopped in a small town for a burger and then hit some different spots farther down on the river. It was really slow. Not even a bite. Even the bait fishers weren’t catching anything. The time of day and the bright sunny skies probably had something to do with it. We fished three different spots with no luck before we finally returned to the headwaters we fished in the morning. I tied on a stimmy followed by a #14 pink squirrel. I made a few drifts through an awesome bridge hole without a hit. I realized that I wasn’t getting deep enough, so I tied on a tungsten pink squirrel 16″ off the first one. That got me to the bottom and into some fish, two browns and two more nice brookies. Dad sneaked a few minutes of fishing in and caught a nice brookie. Pink was definitely the prefered color today. If you don’t have any pink squirrels in your box, TIE SOME UP. They’re amazing.

Tight Lines,

Conner

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